Teaching

I am teaching Political Economy for master's students and Quantitative Economic History for bachelor students at the University of Vienna. In the past I have been a graduate teaching assistant of Applied Econometrics and Economic Growth at the University of Lausanne.

Political Economy (MA)

The aim of this course is to understand how policy decisions are made, what shapes the incentives and constraints of the policy-makers taking those decisions, and how conflicts over policy are resolved. The course covers both theoretical and empirical research. The first part of the course focuses on political competition and voter behaviour; the second introduces partisan politics and political agency. The third part focuses on political institutions and economic policy. The last part covers important topics at the frontier of current research in political economy and introduces current empirical methods in applied political economy.

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Quantitative Economic History (BA)

The aim of this course is to introduce the measures used in long-run applied economic history, their theoretical underpinnings, and their implications in empirical research. The course covers both theoretical and empirical research. The first part of the course (Sessions 1-11) focuses on historical stylized facts and proposes a theoretical framework that generates predictions in line with these facts. The second part (Sessions 12-18) focuses on empirical research in economic history and the implications theory has on estimation. The last part (Sessions 19-24) consists of student presentations.

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